‘Comes The Day’ – Singing Workshop

Event

The society’s conductor, Guy Turner, is also a composer, and on September 23rd he and David Machell will be leading a Come and sing Day on their own compositions, supported by Anthony Clare, Piano and Harriet Astbury, Soprano.

Tickets are now on sale: Please contact Guy Turner on guyscottturner@gmail.com or phone 01636 816393

 

Bingham Choral Society to launch bursary and prize

News

In the autumn Bingham Choral Society will launch a bursary and prize, to be awarded to an outstanding candidate aged 23 or under, who seeks to make a career in classical music.  The bursary, donated by our Patron Mr. John Beaumont and his wife Barbara, will be worth £500.  The winner will be expected to use the bursary money to advance their musical education.  The prize will be the opportunity to take part in one of the Choir’s future concerts.

The competition for the bursary and prize is open to any musician (singer or instrumentalist) normally resident in Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire, Leicestershire, Lincolnshire or Rutland.  Applications will be invited in the early autumn, with a shortlist announced in November.  Shortlisted candidates will be invited to give a short recital at the public final, to be held in Bingham Parish Church on Saturday January 20th, 2018.  The judging panel will include Angela Kay MBE, and Guy Turner, Musical Director of the Bingham Choir.

Full details, including information on how to enter, will be available shortly on this website. There will be a non-refundable entry fee of £10.

John Rutter leads a Singing Day for Bingham Choir

News

John Rutter, the legendary composer and conductor of choral music, came to lead a Singing Day at The Minster School, Southwell, on Saturday at the invitation of the Bingham and District Choral Society.  Judith Unell, Publicity Officer for the choir, says, ‘We just couldn’t believe our luck when John agreed to do this for us because he has such an incredibly busy schedule of international commitments. We feel very honoured’  The Singing Day was widely advertised and quickly sold out with more than 300 people attending.   Four young members of the Minster Girls’ Choir helped ensure that things ran smoothly on the day and also took the opportunity to pose for a photo with John.

John Rutter with (l-r) Joanna Bennett, Alexia Doyne-Ditmas, Anna Wood and Molly Barker from The Minster Girls’ Choir

His exuberant and warm personality enabled everyone to relax and experience the joy of singing, but also to benefit from his immense knowledge of vocal technique. There were plenty of highly entertaining anecdotes too, drawn from his rich musical career.  The choice of musical pieces ranged from the poignant and delicate ‘Who is Silvia’ by British composer George Shearing to the storming adaptation by John himself of `When the Saints go Marching In’ at the end of an uplifting, entertaining and unforgettable day.

Feedback from the John Rutter singing day

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John Rutter at the BDCS Singing Day

“It was a real privilege to have the chance to sing with John Rutter; he is a superb facilitator and raconteur as well as an outstanding musician, and he is so right that people rarely get the chance just to sing good music, not prepare for a performance!  His suggestions for improvement were so well paced and mostly limited to the morning when we could all expect to be fresher.  And the Hallelujah chorus after lunch is the best solution I’ve come across to what I have usually heard described as ‘the graveyard slot’!”

“I am dropping you a note to say thank you to you and to everyone in the Bingham Choral Society for organising the wonderful day we all enjoyed so much last Saturday. I have sung many Rutter works over the years including his Gloria and Requiem but had never had the opportunity to experience working with him or to be able to thank him for the joy he has given. Sadly, my husband died at the end of July last year and I chose The Lord Bless You and Keep You as the choir anthem for his funeral, it was very special and very poignant when we sang it on Saturday.”

“Just a note to say thank you to all concerned for the John Rutter singing day on Saturday.  It was a wonderful day when if we weren’t singing we were smiling.  So uplifting!

 

Tony Goldstone

News

The whole choir was very sad to hear of Tony Goldstone’s death, on January 2nd.  Tony and his wife and duettist partner Caroline Clemmow had become our firm friends and musical collaborators over a number of years, and our thoughts and sympathies go out to Caroline.

Anthony Goldstone was born in Liverpool in 1944.  His family moved to Manchester where he attended Manchester Grammar School.  He studied piano at the Royal Manchester School of Music, and continued with Maria Curcio, who had been a pupil of the legendary Artur Schnabel.  Tony enjoyed early success, appearing at the Last Night of the Proms in 1976, playing an early Britten work for left hand piano and orchestra.  After the concert was broadcast, the composer wrote to him, ‘Thank you most sincerely for that brilliant performance of my Diversions.’

Tony and Caroline began playing together in 1984, quickly having great success, and they married in 1989.  There is a surprisingly large repertoire of music, better known in other formats, which has been arranged for either piano duet or two pianos.  Tony added extensively to this by making many of his own arrangements.  Their discography includes over twenty CDs, with music by a full range of composers from Mozart to the present day.  Last December they issued a disc of Vaughan Williams arrangements, including his Symphony No. 5 and the Tallis Fantasia, that is especially recommended (Albion Records ALBCD031).

Tony and Caroline lived near Scunthorpe, and it was through Neville Ward’s work with Scunthorpe Choral Society that they came to the notice of the Bingham Choir.  In 2006 they played with us in a concert of music by John Rutter, Bob Chilcott and George Gershwin, with Neville conducting.  We repeated that programme in autumn 2015, when it became the first concert that Guy Turner conducted on becoming our Musical Director in succession to Neville.  It was a great success and the joy given to the audience by some additional duets that Caroline and Tony played was duly noted.  We therefore invited them to give us a complete concert of duets.

That concert took place last September, before a packed audience in Bingham Church.  One of the highlights of a spellbinding evening was the second half wholly devoted to Saint-Saens’ Carnival of the animals, with the poems of John Lithgow narrated by Guy Turner.  Sadly, that wonderful concert was to be one of Tony Goldstone’s last public performances.

 

Chairman’s sponsored run raises over £250 for BDCS

News

John BannisterIn October, you sponsored me to run the 13.1 miles of the Birmingham Half Marathon. Because my run is a fund raiser for the choir, I run in a white shirt and bow tie, among other things.  This also helps to get me an occasional cheer.  My ambition is to get round in under two hours, which I did a couple of years ago.  This year I completed in 2hrs 6mins.  Every runner is issued with a number and a chip, a unique marker attached to the back of the number which records when you cross the start and finish lines and I suspect one or two points in between.

To train for the race I do a couple of runs each fortnight which usually include a section by the River Trent.  This year, I had what I think is an Achilles tendon injury which prevented me running for about 4 weeks, although I got going again six weeks or so before the run.

On the day, I did really well until about half way and looked like I would be inside the two hours.  Then I began to lose energy, and was also concerned that I might get cramp, which would really slow me down. I slowed to avoid walking or ceasing up, but too much, so although going up hill in the sections before the end was hard work, I did a good final 500 meters boosted by a friendly face in the crowd.

Your donations came to over £250. Thank you.

John Bannister, BDCS Chairman

Goldstone-Clemmow concert

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Goldstone_Clemmow_Turner
Goldstone, Clemmow & Turner

The Choir promoted a concert by the acclaimed duettists Anthony Goldstone and Caroline Clemmow pictured left at the piano.  A packed Bingham Parish Church heard a programme which in the first half had music by Schubert: Marche Militaire No. 1 and variations from the Trout Quintet, Rimsky-Korsakov: Scherezade and Vincent Youmans: Tea for two.  The second half was devoted to Tony Goldstone’s own arrangement for piano duet of Saint Saens’ Carnival of the animals.  Poems written to accompany the work by American actor John Lithgow were performed by Guy Turner, our Musical Director (pictured on the right.)  Many people feel that Lithgow’s poems are better than those written by Ogden Nash.  As an encore, Tony and Caroline played a short work by English composer Eric Thiman (1900 – 1975), whose archive is held at Southwell Minster and administrated by Guy Turner.

An extensive range of discs by the Goldstone-Clemmow duo can be found at (Link) and their future concerts will include a performance of Brahms’ German Requiem with the Choir.

Anthony Goldstone & Caroline Clemmow Concert 24th September, St. Mary & All Saints Parish Church, Bingham

News

With about forty CDs to their credit and a busy concert schedule stretching back more than thirty years, the British piano duo Goldstone and Clemmow is firmly established as a leading force. Described by Gramophone as ‘a dazzling husband and wife team’, by International Record Review as ‘a British institution in the best sense of the word’, and by The Herald, Glasgow, as ‘the UK’s pre-eminent two-piano team’, internationally known artists Anthony Goldstone and Caroline Clemmow formed their duo in 1984 and married in 1989.

Goldstone and Clemmow photoTheir extremely diverse activities in two-piano and piano-duet recitals and double concertos, taking in major festivals, have sent them all over the British Isles as well as to Europe, the Middle East and several times to the U.S.A., where they have received standing ovations and such press accolades as ‘revelations such as this are rare in the concert hall these days’ (Charleston Post and Courier). In their refreshingly presented concerts they mix famous masterpieces and fascinating rarities, which they frequently unearth themselves, into absorbing and hugely entertaining programmes; their numerous B.B.C. broadcasts have often included first hearings of unjustly neglected works, and their equally enterprising and acclaimed commercial recordings include many world premières.
Having presented the complete duets of Mozart for the bicentenary, they decided to accept the much greater challenge of performing the vast quantity of music written by Schubert specifically for four hands at one piano. This they have repeated several times in mammoth seven-concert cycles, probably a world first in their completeness (including works not found in the collected edition) and original recital format. The Musical Times wrote of this venture: ‘The Goldstone/Clemmow performances invited one superlative after another.’
The complete cycle (as a rare bonus including as encores Schumann’s eight Schubert- inspired Polonaises) was recorded on seven CDs, ‘haunted with the spirit of Schubert’ – Luister, The Netherlands.